Category: hollywood vampires

Aerosmith’s Joe Perry talks about new album, b…

Aerosmith’s Joe Perry talks about new album, busy life, upcoming tours: undefined

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Nick Cave, Johnny Depp top bill at Montreux Ja…

Nick Cave, Johnny Depp top bill at Montreux Jazz Festival: undefined

Nick Cave, Johnny Depp, Iggy Pop to headline M…

Nick Cave, Johnny Depp, Iggy Pop to headline Montreux Jazz fest: undefined

Joe Perry returns to the Granite State April 1…

Joe Perry returns to the Granite State April 19:

becauseitisjohnnydepp:

EDGE: You worked with Johnny Depp on this thing. I know you’ve worked with him in Hollywood Vampires, etc., but what was it like working with him on your own thing? What sort of insight and sound did Johnny’s involvement bring to this project?

Perry: Well, first you gotta understand that Johnny is a musician. And a serious one at that. I’ve always been a big fan of his – seen all of his movies. Well, a lot of them, anyhow. I remember seeing “Chocolat,” where he plays that river gypsy character. And in that film he’s actually playing some music – some Django Reinhardt-inspired stuff with that song “Caravan.” I thought to myself at that time that I’d like to meet this guy eventually and have him teach me how to play that. As fortune would have it, I eventually did get the opportunity to meet him and we became fast friends. At some point along the way, he mentioned that he had a studio and he wanted me to hang out for a bit and record a solo album. That’s basically how this whole record started. It was instrumental in scope at first and just morphed from there as we added different voices such as David Johansen, Terry Reid, Robin Zander, etc. Once they got involved and started singing, I couldn’t deny it (laughs). I’m so grateful those guys wanted to hang out and work on some stuff.

But yeah, when Johnny wasn’t busy working – on a movie, or whatever – he’d stop into the studio and listen to the tracks myself and Bruce Witkin, my producer, were working on. He’d offer some feedback and pretty much helped kind of steer some of the direction of the different places we wound up taking this thing. Man, I wouldn’t have even started it if he hadn’t suggested it, honestly

Johnny Depp among headliners at Jazz Festival …

Johnny Depp among headliners at Jazz Festival | Dhaka Tribune: undefined

Nick Cave, Johnny Depp top bill at Montreux Ja…

Nick Cave, Johnny Depp top bill at Montreux Jazz Festival: undefined

Nick Cave, Johnny Depp, Iggy Pop to headline M…

Nick Cave, Johnny Depp, Iggy Pop to headline Montreux Jazz fest: undefined

Joe Perry returns to the Granite State April 1…

Joe Perry returns to the Granite State April 19:

EDGE: You worked with Johnny Depp on this thing. I know you’ve worked with him in Hollywood Vampires, etc., but what was it like working with him on your own thing? What sort of insight and sound did Johnny’s involvement bring to this project?

Perry: Well, first you gotta understand that Johnny is a musician. And a serious one at that. I’ve always been a big fan of his – seen all of his movies. Well, a lot of them, anyhow. I remember seeing “Chocolat,” where he plays that river gypsy character. And in that film he’s actually playing some music – some Django Reinhardt-inspired stuff with that song “Caravan.” I thought to myself at that time that I’d like to meet this guy eventually and have him teach me how to play that. As fortune would have it, I eventually did get the opportunity to meet him and we became fast friends. At some point along the way, he mentioned that he had a studio and he wanted me to hang out for a bit and record a solo album. That’s basically how this whole record started. It was instrumental in scope at first and just morphed from there as we added different voices such as David Johansen, Terry Reid, Robin Zander, etc. Once they got involved and started singing, I couldn’t deny it (laughs). I’m so grateful those guys wanted to hang out and work on some stuff.

But yeah, when Johnny wasn’t busy working – on a movie, or whatever – he’d stop into the studio and listen to the tracks myself and Bruce Witkin, my producer, were working on. He’d offer some feedback and pretty much helped kind of steer some of the direction of the different places we wound up taking this thing. Man, I wouldn’t have even started it if he hadn’t suggested it, honestly